Monday, July 7, 2014

PELAGORNIS SANDERSI IN DAZ 3D

TO: RENDER FROM DIV SUBJ ANCIENT BIRD

REPORTED IN NAT GEO TODAY:

The wingspan of Pelagornis sandersi dwarfs that of today's biggest flier, the royal albatross, whose span measures a "mere" 11.5 feet (3.5 meters). And it rivals that of the largest flying bird on record: Argentavis magnificensa South American condor with a 23-foot (7-meter) wingspan that glided among the mountaintops of the Andes six million years ago.
"Pelagornis was certainly much lighter and a better 'flier'" than the vanished giant condor, says paleontologist Antoine Louchart of France's Institute of Functional Genomics in Lyon, who was not involved with the study.


BELOW FIND RUDIMENTARY BONE STRUCTURE MAPPED FROM AVAILABLE IMAGE:







STAY UPDATED ON SUBJ MATTER


DIV...

TO: RENDER FROM DIV SUBJ ANCIENT BIRD

Monday, April 28, 2014

TRITONIA SUIT:...


PROJECT NEKTON: TRITONIA SUIT


OTIS BARTON: DIPHROBENTH 1938

Lawrence Journal-World, Jan 11, 1938 Mile-Deep Dive in New Ocean Bottom Chariot 

NEW YORK--One mile down to the unknown floor of the sea is the goal set by Otis Barton, designer of the bathysphere, for a new submarine apparatus he is designing. It will be on wheels and is called "diphrobenth," Greek for "chariot of the bottom." It is now in the blue-print stage at the Watson-Stillman Hydraulic Co. plant, Roselle, N.J., builders of the bathysphere. In the earlier diving chamber Mr. Barton and Dr. William Beebe descended half a mile in the ocean off Bermuda, the world's record dive. "The diphrobenth," Mr. Barton says, "is being built to explore the ocean bottom to a depth of over a mile--not to observe life in the mid-depth of the ocean far above the bottom as was the bathysphere. On the bottom there is more unknown marine life than in mid-depth. It is the world's greatest mystery.





To Have a Camera

To probe the mystery the diphrobenth will travel on three wheels over the bottom ooze and coral bumps, towed by a steel cable. From one of its two focused quartz eyes will project a powerful shaft of light.
At the other will be a camera lens for motion picture record. The chariot's eyes are set back to prevent the windows from shattering in collision with a wreck or coral reef.
By removing the camera and dimming the 2,000-watt bulb of the searchlight one or two observers will be able to descend in the diphrobenth's cramped quarters. The light would have to be dimmed because at full voltage its heat would be unbearable. There is also the danger that the heat may crack one of the quartz windows.
The ocean off Bermuda again will be the setting for this new and more spectacular venture in probing the mysteries of the deep. Dr. Beebe's heavy reel winch and other equipment used in the bathysphere dives are in storage there, and at St. George's there is an experienced crew, veterans of the Beebe-Barton expeditions. In addition, Mr. Barton explains, it is possible to reach deep water off Bermuda by going out not more than 10 miles.


Like itrs predecessor, the new device will be lowered from a barge towed seaward by a tug. A 6,000 foot spliced cable of five-eighth inch and half inch steel will lower and pull the chariot on the ocean's floor. An electric cable will control camewra and light.
Asked what dangers he might face if he removed the camera if he removed the camera from the diphrobenth and descended as an observer in the sealed compartment, Mr. Barton said:
"I would be in constant touch by telephone with those on the barge. If anything started to go wrong, I could signal it in time to be drawn up to safety. Of course, if the steel cable got tangled in a wreck, I might be down for good."
It is possible that Doctor Beebe may join the expedition when the diphrobenth begins its ocean-probing trundle, but for the time being Mr. Barton is going it alone. The first descent of the sea chariot will take place without passenger, with the movie camera set to take pictures when the bottom is reached.
The diphrobenth, made of welded steel, will be able to withstand a pressure of 2,650 pounds per square inch 6,000 feet down. Its weight in the water will be 1,000 pounds. (The submerged bathysphere weighed a ton). The internal diameter of the new diving apparatus will be 48 1/3 inches, with an air capacity of 35 cubic feet. An air conditioning plant will provide oxygen for respiration and absorb excess moisture.
Precautions have been taken in the design to prevent the electric cable from being forced inside by sea pressure, which occurred in the bathysphere in June, 1930, endangering Mr. Barton and Doctor Beebe. The electric cable will enter the steel ball thru tapered insulators.


For Science's Sake

 
Mr. Barton estimates the total costs of building and launching the diphrobenth as folows: $6,000 for construction, $500 for transportation, and $2500 for the expedition.
"Unfortunately," he says, "there is no commercial angle in this. I wish there were. It's in the realm of pure science, I'm afraid."
A bald, oldish young man of 38, he talks intensely with a rush of words, sketching aspects of the diphrobenth as he talks. He is afraid you won't understand the sea chariot if he doesn't do this. He is a paleontologist who started out to study fossil bones and turned to fishes--"it's the same line."